You may have heard people say that the King James Bible translators did a bad job translating.


This can be disproved in many ways given enough time. But here I will give one small example. Have you noticed the King James Bible uses italics? Here I compare Proverbs 6:11 and Proverbs 24:34 and show how specific the King James Bible translators were in their use of italics. The verses have the exact same text, except that in Proverbs 24:34 the word "as" is in italics. I show you why. Watch carefully:


Proverbs 6:6-11

6 Go to the ant, thou sluggard; consider her ways, and be wise:

7 Which having no guide, overseer, or ruler,

8 Provideth her meat in the summer, and gathereth her food in the harvest.

9 How long wilt thou sleep, O sluggard? when wilt thou arise out of thy sleep?

10 Yet a little sleep, a little slumber, a little folding of the hands to sleep:

11 So shall thy poverty come as one that travelleth, and thy want

as an armed man.


Proverbs 6:11

So shall thy poverty come as one that travelleth, and thy want

as an armed man.


So shall thy povertyH7389 comeH935 [H8804] as one that travellethH1980 [H8764], and thy wantH4270 as an armedH4043 manH376.



ובאH935 כמהלךH1980 ראשׁךH7389 ומחסרךH4270 כאישׁH376 מגן׃H4043


וּבָֽא ־ כִמְ הַלֵּ֥ךְ רֵאשֶׁ֑ךָ וּ֝מַחְסֹֽרְךָ֗ כְּאִ֣ישׁ מָגֵֽן׃

הלךH1980 haw-lak' : a root meaning walk and by extension to give trouble through some action (to travail/travell)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Proverbs 24:34

So shall thy poverty come as one that travelleth; and thy want

as an armed man.


So shall thy povertyH7389 comeH935 [H8804] as one that travellethH1980 [H8693]; and thy wantH4270 as an armedH4043 manH376.



ובאH935 מתהלךH1980 רישׁךH7389 ומחסריךH4270 כאישׁH376 מגן׃H4043


וּבָֽא ־ מִתְ הַלֵּ֥ךְ רֵישֶׁ֑ךָ וּ֝מַחְסֹרֶ֗יךָ כְּאִ֣ישׁ מָגֵֽן׃


Proverbs 24:30-34

30 I went by the field of the slothful, and by the vineyard of the man void of understanding;

31 And, lo, it was all grown over with thorns, and nettles had covered the face thereof, and the stone wall thereof was broken down.

32 Then I saw, and considered it well: I looked upon it, and received instruction.

33 Yet a little sleep, a little slumber, a little folding of the hands to sleep:

34 So shall thy poverty come as one that travelleth; and thy want as an armed man.






"as" and "as" means the same so why the difference as seen above and why does it matter?


short answer: accuracy. The KJV is very accurate.

longer answer:


"You all eat the bread." כולכם לאכול את הלחם means the same as

"Eat the bread." כולכם לאכול את הלחם

(with a context of pointing to several people in person, thus indicating plurality/plural number)



"You all" is missing in the second sentence. However in Hebrew, morphological change is used on one word (לאכול) to indicate the plural of eat, not with several words as in English. English grammar rules allow the deletion of "You all". Hebrew being a different language, created differently than English, can not do this when translating these two sentences. So the words to translate the two sentences in Hebrew are exactly the same. The first Lamed in לאכול indicates the "you all". Notice I put the Lamed in italics in the Hebrew translation of the second sentence. I did this to indicate the "you all" was not actually present in the English, but was implied. The first Lamed of לאכול can NOT be eliminated from the Hebrew text and still have the text imply plural, as "You all" can be eliminated from the English text. In fact it without the italic Lamed, the Hebrew would indicate singular not plural.


So now back to the question about the "as" in proverbs.


In Hebrew, when the letter Caph is prefixed to a word as in Proverbs 6:11 above ( כמהלךH1980)it indicates "as"/"like"/"similar to". As seen above, Proverbs 24:34 says the exact same thing in English except the "as" of, "as one that travelleth" is in italics. The translators were being so accurate they even indicated the missing Caph, which also agrees with the other morphological changes in the Hebrew of this scripture.


The Hebrew has an implied, but not written "as" and this carries through into the accurate King James Version, even for something so slight. In Hebrew, the Caph can be eliminated and still convey the meaning, "as". This can not be done in the English sentence. The following altered sentence is confusing:


"He is big as a barn." alteration follows "He is big a barn."


Is the second sentence speaking of a man named Mr. Big A. Barn ????


No.


In the altered example, the "as" is missing thus creating a confusing bit of English-like text.


The KJV translators were so accurate and respectful of the original language Holy Scripture, that they indicated implied meaning from the language, with italics, when it was not a written meaning.


as the Holy Scriptures say, "For God is not the author of confusion... " The KJV is accurate in all details.